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San Pasqual

Sikes Adobe - 1869. Severely damaged. Sikes Adobe engulfed in flames early in the morning on October 26. The 1870's wood section is completely gone and only its adobe walls are left standing. Plans for stabilization are currently underway, restoration of the adobe section and reconstruction plans will follow. Photo ©Scott Ressler Photography.


This group of homes and farms nestled into the San Pasqual valley was one of the most picturesque and the largest intact examples of San Diego's late nineteenth century rural heritage. You may recall the photos of this beautiful landscape from the Winter 2007 issue of Our Heritage magazine where it was highlighted as one of San Diego's greatest surviving cultural landscapes. This was a place where you could truly experience a lost era.

The Farmhouse is located on property owned by the City of San Diego Water Department and operated as a museum by the San Dieguito River Park. Restored in January 2004, photo by Susan Carter.


The 19th century farmsteads and complimentary buildings were in public ownership by the City of San Diego, but already in peril before the fire. Ignoring their own ordinance of demolition by neglect, the city not only allowed these structures to deteriorate but they also allowed the TV show Renegade to graffiti the historic adobe school house, though listed on SOHO's most endangered list. The city didn't even bother to have the film company return it to its pre-graffiti condition.

The City also neglected to designate these historic sites, although they had commissioned a survey that gave overwhelming evidence as to their outstanding historic merits.

Could this irreplaceable resource, an area arrested in time have been saved? Absolutely, if they had been valued to begin with. Restored, protected and in use, they would have been well known and flagged as important cultural resources. But the reality is that the city viewed them as a problem. Your children will never know firsthand what San Diego's 19th century back country looked like. Any city with even a modicum of vision would have promoted this area as a historic park where the substantial economic benefits of cultural heritage tourism could have provided the funds for many things, including the extra fire equipment needed to protect the valley.

John Clevenger House - c. 1872. Lost. This was the oldest house in San Pasqual valley.


Left Highland Valley Winery - 1919. Lost. Right San Pasqual Store - 1930's-40's. Lost. This country store was owned by the Peets, Haleys and others through the years, and also served as the community gathering place for over 60 years


Henry Fenton/Bandy Canyon Ranch - c. 1930's. Heavily damaged. With some cottages and outbuildings lost, the main house is under renovation now and the hope is to reopen it soon.


Though at least half of the historic buildings that made this place so special have been lost, this makes the remaining structures even more precious. The proper steps must be taken now to preserve what is left. Restoration of the adobe schoolhouse, the only one of its type in San Diego County, must begin immediately.This group of homes and farms nestled into the San Pasqual valley was one of the most picturesque and the largest intact examples of San Diego's late nineteenth century rural heritage. You may recall the photos of this beautiful landscape from the Winter 2007 issue of Our Heritage magazine where it was highlighted as one of San Diego's greatest surviving cultural landscapes. This was a place where you could truly experience a lost era.

The 19th century farmsteads and complimentary buildings were in public ownership by the City of San Diego, but already in peril before the fire. Ignoring their own ordinance of demolition by neglect, the city not only allowed these structures to deteriorate but they also allowed the TV show Renegade to graffiti the historic adobe school house, though listed on SOHO's most endangered list. The city didn't even bother to have the film company return it to its pre-graffiti condition. Click to view

Rockwood Ranch Barn - 1883. Lost. One of the last great ranch barns from the Victorian period in the county. The Ranch house escaped the fire's path, but is now being gutted after 100 plus years by its new owners, the Rodney Company.


Peet-Haley House - 1908. Lost. Mary Rockwood Peet was a historian and writer, and was married to dairy rancher Everett Peet in 1899. In the 1940's the home was owned by Jack Haley, the actor best known for his role as the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz.


Andrew Judson House - c. 1896-97. Lost. The Judson family has lived in and around this valley for well over 100 years.


John B. Judson House - c. 1880's. Lost. This elegant home served as a focal point for the community and acted as an informal post office for a time.


More about the wildfires

2007 - Volume 38, Issue 3/4

MORE FROM THIS ISSUE

VIEW digital online version


From the Editor


Reconstructing Balboa Park's "Dream City"
Names & Milestones in the History of Prado Buildings

10 Vanished Balboa Park Landmarks


Historic Losses: Fires Devastate San Diego San Diego County's Historic Sites


California Tile: Our Claim to Tile Fame


The Use of Tile in the Home


Tile Resources


President's Message


Reflections


In Memoriam - Beth Montes


The Beth Montes Memorial Internship & Outreach Fund

Book Reviews


Letters to the Editor


Lost San Diego


Strength in Numbers


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